Why Collaboration is Digital’s Next Killer App

JERRY

In the movie Jerry Maguire, Tom Cruise’s character has a crisis of conscience. One evening during a league meeting crafts a manifesto of sorts about how sports agents, colleagues, and competitors, could all do a better job serving the best interests of their clients. In the fever pitch of finishing this document, he distributes copies to every single person at the meeting and is greeted with uproarious applauses of approval by his fellow agents.

A week later Jerry had lost all but one of his clients, and his career was in ruins.

Hopefully this won’t be my Jerry Maguire moment, but much like Tom Cruise’s character, the manifesto that follows is probably long overdue because it’s 2014 and pharma still stinks at digital marketing.

Having been in the industry for 18+ years now, I continue to observe the same recurring challenges that plague the business and severely impact the quality of the work. These challenges typically take the following forms.

On the agency side:

  • Work is often done in silos: With little to no collaboration between agency teams the end result is almost always very transactional programs. Media, web, mobile, social, PR, etc., are more often than not being managed by different agencies with little or no incentive to cooperate and collaborate
  • Ideas are transactional: Isolated thinking more often than not translates into an extremely low value ideas with little to no enduring value or utility.
  • Agencies are built to sell: They approach work as a zero sum game. Less for you is more for me. Instead of focusing on brand growth, they are incentivized to try and take revenue from other agency partners.
  • Teams are highly suspicious of one another: Internal or external, the territorial behaviors associated with the previously mentioned challenges kill the scale of a program, as working with another group or agency puts your own revenue at risk.

It’s incredibly easy to focus on the agency side of things, but all is not rosy on the client side of things either. Agencies are, for the most part, a reflection of the clients that manage them, and their behavior is a result of the leaders who manage them.

Some challenges on the client side include:

  • High turnover rates = short term management: Most clients don’t stay in their roles longer than 18-24 months, so programs aren’t designed, built, or managed for mid-long term success.
  • An over-emphasis on innovation: The hunt for ‘the next big thing’ is a constant churn, and comically ineffective. Pharma clients typically define innovation as “new” instead of “better.” Any innovative program by that definition typically can’t build the kind of meaningful scale needed to be effective in the short term, as the audiences and utilization need to be grown. That lack of immediate scale leads to, you guessed it, the eventual hunt for the next ‘next big thing.’
  • Clients are built to buy: Given the relative lack of marketing experience most pharma clients have when they enter their marketing roles, the focus is almost entirely on generating tactics. This leads to an“ I’ll know it when I see it” culture that constantly churns through vendors and pitches with the end result being little to no cohesion in a marketing plan.
  • “Vendor” mindset: The end result of all of this is a disposable attitude towards a client’s agency partners. Any effort to provide strategic council is often rebuffed, and if a client is counseled that an “exciting “ idea may not fit with the overall brand strategy, the consequence for the agency is to be told “if you won’t build this for me, I’ll get someone who will.” Read More…

“Journalism”

My favorite line from the piece, got added AFTER it ran for days.

“Correction: This video was actually created by marketing students at Berghs School of Communication, and is not made by Google, nor is Google Gesture a real service. We updated the story below and apologize for the error.”

Link

5 Key Takeaways From the FDA’s Draft Guidance On Presenting Risk/Benefit With Character Limitations

fda

The FDA recently released two documents providing draft guidance on the utilization of particular aspects of social media. The first was entitled, Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation about prescription Drugs and Medical Devices. The second was entitled, Internet/Social Media Limitations – Presenting Risk And Benefit Information for Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices, which is the focus of this post.

While not as clear or concise as their other previous guidance releases, there are 5 key things digital marketers need to be aware of, some of which potentially muddying the waters more then originally planned.

1. Brands may present product claims within character–limited setting, but must include several elements to be considered compliant.

If and when a brand or product chooses to put claim information inside of a tweet, the claim must contain several elements, including:

  • The product and generic name
  • Appropriate balance for the claim being made
  • A direct link to a page containing more complete discussion of the associated risks of the product

The example used by the FDA is for a fictitious product, NoFocus, with the structure of the tweet illuminating the requirements.

NoFocus (rememberzineHCL) for mild to moderate memory loss; may cause seizures in patients with a seizure disorder www.nofocus.com/risk

When presenting balance to a claim, the brand or product does not need to present the full risk statement, but instead is required to communicate, “the most serious risks associated with the product.” Read More…

5 Key Takeaways From the FDA’s Draft Guidance On Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation

fda

 

Yesterday the FDA released not one, but two documents providing draft guidance on the utilization of particular aspects of social media, entitled Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation about prescription Drugs and Medical Devices, which is the focus of this post. The other, Internet/Social Media Limitations – Presenting Risk And Benefit Information for Prescription Drugs and Medical Devicescan be read about in another posting.

In keeping with the tradition of most of these releases, these guidelines are drafts and may change over time, but in reading them there are 5 key things digital marketers need to be aware of.

1. Brands may host open conversations on corporate-owned sites, without being responsible for the content.

This is surprising news, but the FDA’s own example for what its guidance entails opens the door for such communications. Beginning on line 141 the FDA writes,

“Example 4: A firm hosts a discussion forum about its drug’s or device’s FDA-approved use on its corporate website and does not participate in the discussion, but it does monitor the forum for profanity and obscenity. The forum includes an overarching clear and conspicuous statement that the firm did not create the content of the forum. The firm is not responsible for the information that is posted by independent third parties and can, if it so chooses, correct misinformation according to this guidance.”

For years, brands have struggled with the possibility of hosting discussions, particularly as they relate to educating patients and interested parties about how to use or stay compliant with a particular product. This statement by the FDA indicates that that activity is now approved for consideration. One caveat, the guidance does not release the brand/corporation from monitoring for possible adverse event notifications, only stating that the brand/corporation is free from responsibility for the content being posted by independent third-parties. Read More…